All boxing fans have heard of Eric "Butterbean" Esch. The larger than life American Heavyweight who has been featured not only in a boxing ring but also in a wide variety of media including Jackass, WWF, Big Law: Deputy Butterbean, Hulk Hogan's Celebrity Championship Wrestling  and various other TV shows. He is after all a very, very well known fighter, even if he was more of a comedy figure than a world level boxer.

Less well known how ever is Finnish Heavyweight Janne Johannes Katajisto (11-0-1, 5), who scored his biggest win so far just a few weeks ago by defeating veteran Brit Danny Williams (44-12-0-1, 33) by 8 round unanimous decision. Despite being much less well known Katajisto has a well known nickname, the "Finnish Butterbean", this is due to his physical similarity to Esch.

Like Esch, Katajisto is a short round and skin headed fighter with more rolls around the middle than any human should have, so the nickname was always an obvious one Though sadly at 33 years old the "Finnish Butterbean" is unlikely to ever make any where near the same sizable (excuse the pun) splash as the original Butterbean.

Katajisto made his debut back in 2009 (see the video below for that) and won his first 8 bouts claiming the very lightly regarded Baltic Boxing Union International Heavyweight title along the way.

In his 9th professional bout Katajisto could only score a draw with Latvian journeyman Pavels Dolgovs, the only so far on Katajisto's record. Since then however he has strung together 3 successive victories (including the decision win over Williams) which has seen him becoming the Finnish Heavyweight Champion. Though real questions do need to be asked about just how far he will go.

Video here thanks to MiikaF (it's of Katajisto's debut v Igor Evseev)

 
 
Picture
This coming weekend see's the fifth professional bout for 24 year old American Derrick Murray (4-0, 3). Whilst there lots of good nicknames out there, I think Murray genuinely has one of the most amusing as he is known as "Whoop Dat Ass".

Murray made his professional debut back in April 2011 and scored a 3rd round TKO over James Grant before adding 3 more victories this year. He'll be looking for victory number on Friday as he faces the unbeaten Ecuadorian Pedro Toledo (1-0) at the Doubletree Hotel, Ontario, California.

Apparently given the nickname by co-manager Rick Repo, I'd say that Repo and Murray have made an excellent choice. Not only is memorable but it's also pretty original and if he fails in boxing Murray could become a farm hand helping with disobedient donkey's.



 
 
On this site I've tended to stay away from the Amateur boxing scene. In all honesty I don't tend to follow it, I don't tend to care too much for it and what I do what I tend to feel is badly scored and frustrating to make sense of. Just take the recent Olympics for example where poor scoring, poor decisions and some awful officiating really made the tournament unwatchable at times. However when I do look at amateur boxing for this site, I tend to find something a bit special....such as Ghana's amazingly named Prince Octopus Dzanie.

The royally named Octopoda honestly has one of the best names I've ever seen in sport. Not only has it got animal links (where are always brilliant) but he's also got the royal theme which makes the name doubly brilliant. Sadly however Dzanie's most memorable moment inside the ring was an 11:2 loss to Cuban Idel Torriente in the 2008 Olympic games.

Although it was rumoured in 2011 that Dzanie was about to turn professional it seems that his debut was cancelled, though I'm not sure what he's gone on to do since then...however he was featured, at least by name on British TV show "A Question Of Sport", as you can see in the clip below.

Clip courtesy of BBC
 
 
Picture
No, not this type of trash!
Pongsaklek Wonjongkam (85-4-2, 45) is one of the greatest Flyweights of all time though his doubters like to point out that he's fought some rubbish to pad his record. Amazingly however if you ever do go through Wonjongkam's record you will not see any rubbish, you will however see trash, Trash Nakanuma (27-6, 12) that is.

Although a relatively fighter (certainly in the West) Nakanuma was a Japanese Flyweight who fought between 1993 and 2006 who twice fought for the world title in a career that was actually a lot more respectable than his unfortunate name.

Born Masaki Nakanuma in 1975 I'll admit I'm not sure where the disparaging "Trash" moniker came from though "Trash" did become the name by which he is known in boxing circles. Nakanuma debuted in 1993 and defeated Ayumi Oki by TKO 2 and over the following few years Nakanuma recorded a 13-2 (3) record.

After starting his career well Nakanuma took almost 2 years out of the ring before returning to face Kenichiro Hamaguchi in a memorable bout that saw Nakanuma attempt to fight with a rabbit tail before referee Masakazu Uchida ripped it off (causing the crowd in attendance to roar with laughter). The victory over Hamagushi kick-started Nakanuma's career and over the following years he followed up with notable wins over Panieng Poontarat and future world champion Takefumi Sakata. The win over Sakata saw "Trash" claiming the Japanese Flyweight title, a title he would defend twice before losing it back to Sakata in 2003.

Following the loss to Takefumi Sakata, Trash attempted to claim the OPBF Flyweight title from Noriyuki Komatsu. Komatsu managed to narrowly outpoint Trash in an incredibly close bout and Trash's record fell to a less than flattering 23-4 (10) however he had proven himself to be a credible contender.

Following losses to both Sakata and Komatsu, Trash then got his chance at the big time as he faced the then WBC Pongsaklek Wongjongkam. Despite being an under-dog against Wonjongkam (who was then 49-2) Trash put up an excellent battle and took the legendary Thai incredibly close. Whilst Wonjongkam never looked in real danger he was pushed close especially in the 12th round as Trash went all out looking for the upset.

After recording 2 wins, including claiming the OPBF title from Noriyuki Komatsu (and gaining revenge for that loss) Trash again got a chance at the big time as he faced the then unbeaten WBA Flyweight champion Lorenzo Parra. Like he did against Wonjongkam, Trash put up an excellent bout and forced Parra to really do all he could to survive in the final 2 rounds and actually dropped Parra just after the bell. Sadly however Parra had bagged enough rounds to successfully defend his title.

Following the loss to Parra, Trash spent a year out of the ring before returning to defeat Pingping Tepura and Jojo Bardon before retiring aged 31 in 2006.