In Thailand boxing is seen as a job however they do have a number of rising fighters that may well seek to make a real name for themselves. One such fighter was the previously unbeaten Petchbodin Por Nobnom (9-1, 6).

Petchbodin had started his boxing career back in 2010 and in just his 7th professional bout he claimed the vacant PABA Lightweight title thanks to a 2nd round TKO victory over Afrizal Cotto (no relation to Miguel). Although he didn't fight t all in 2011 he returned to the ring earlier this year and bagged 2 more victories to move to 9-0 (6) and he was expected to move to 10-0 when he met Jen Yu Jia (2-3, 1).

Unlike Petchbobin, Jen Yu Jia wasn't expected to make a name for himself inside the ring. He only turned professional earlier this year though had really struggled to even claim a victory in his first 4 fights, needing a favourable split decision over Saksri Petchtwin Gym (who had already beaten Jia) to get his first win.

Surprisingly the Chinese born, Thai based Jia managed to defeat Petchbodin thanks to a cut based TKO giving Petchbodin his first loss in 10 bouts and Jia's first stoppage win in 5.

In Thailand, unlike the west, an early career loss doesn't spell the end so expect Petchbodin to return to the ring sooner rather than later, however this is a set back for the Thai.

Note-Sadly Afrizal Cotto passed away earlier, his death was sadly from his injuries suffered in the ring against Irvan Barita Marbun in his native Indonesia.
 
 
At the beginning of the year Leon Williams (9-6, 4) was the British Cruiserweight champion, he had decrowned the long reigning Rob Norton, albeit in controversial fashion. Since then however things have gone downhill, and fast, for Williams who has lost not only his title (being stopped by Shane McPhilbin) but also every fight he has had this year.

Whilst the loss to McPhilbin was a bit of an upset, he later blown out by Tony Conquest in an expected result. A less than expected result however was Williams being completely shut out by Latvian journeyman Arturs Kulikauskis (8-14-3, 4) on Monday. Williams failed to win any of the 8 rounds as Kulikauskis showed him up to be a very, very limited fighter and arguable the worst "British" champion, at any weight, in living memory.

Going into the bout you had to go back over 2 years to find the last fight Kulikauskis won (out pointing Algirdas Bendikas, currently 0-6). Since his last win, Kulikauskis had gone 0-8-2 losing to some very decent fighters such as Thierry Karl, Mateusz Masternak (the only man so far to stop him), Dimitri Sartison (who was somewhat fortunate to earn the decision) and Server Yemurlayev. It may be fair to say that the Latvian could have had a very respectable record had he not been used as "an opponent", though for Williams, the future is bleak and ironically he may well become "an opponent" himself.
 
 
Going into his bout against Chris Higgs (12-1, 1), journeyman William Warburton (9-38-2, 2) had won only 3 of his last 18 bouts. This was supposed to be Higgs' chance to bag another win and claim the vacant International Masters Welterweight title. Sadly for Higgs however Warburton had other things in mind.

Although Higgs started the bout well, Warburton showed his survival instincts and fought back bravely, before changing the flow of the bout in round 6 where he really stunned Higgs. Higgs never really recovered and Warburton managed to counter Higgs wonderfully in the 7th before the previously unbeaten man's legs started to betray him and force the stoppage by referee Ken Curtis.

For Higgs this was certainly unexpected, he wasn't supposed to lose here, though amazingly it was Warburton's fourth victory of the year from an amazing 18 fights! If all fighters were as busy as Warburton has been this year, it'd be fair to say this sport would be much more interesting!